Financial Education

Security

Security

Keep your financial information safe and sound with safeguards that protect you against everything from cyber-attacks to data loss. A few easy steps are all it takes to help prevent financial scams.


We are taking a major step in our ongoing efforts to enhance your online security. Effective Tuesday, August 23, 2016, HawaiiNational.BANK will replace HawaiiNational.com.

Please update your online preferences to reflect the new web address. For your convenience, you will be automatically redirected to HawaiiNational.BANK from our old web address.


All Online Banking features and login information will remain the same.

Hawaii National Bank is the first bank in Hawaii to upgrade to the newly launched .BANK web address.

.BANK is only available for use by verified financial institutions. It offers a higher level of assurance with a strict 30-point registration process that prevents users from being redirected to fake bank websites set up to fraudulently obtain customer information.

.BANK was created by the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) as a trusted, more secure, and easily identifiable space on the internet for banks and their customers worldwide. It is managed by fTLD Registry Services, a group of banks, insurance companies and financial services trade associations, and registration eligibility is verified by Symantec, a globally recognized leader in internet security. The process includes a security check; banking credentials verification; and a review of the bank’s contact information.

In short, we are adopting the .BANK web address to provide you with improved security safeguards.

Please contact us at (808) 528-7711 with any questions. Visit us online 24/7 for secure, innovative and convenient banking services, including Online Bill Pay and external account transfers.

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14 Tips for Stopping Elder Financial Abuse in its Tracks

            Honolulu, HI – Every year, millions of seniors fall victim to financial fraud. Studies show elder financial abuse costs seniors approximately $2.9 billion each year. In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on June 15, Hawaii National Bank is urging older customers and their trusted caregivers to safeguard all personal information and stay alert to the common signs of financial abuse.

 

Hawaii National Bank is offering the following tips:

  • Plan ahead to protect your assets and to ensure your wishes are followed.  Talk to someone at your financial institution, an attorney, or financial advisor about the best options for you.
  • Carefully choose a trustworthy person to act as your agent in all estate-planning matters.
  • Lock up your checkbook, account statements and other sensitive information when others will be in your home.
  • Never give personal information, including Social Security Number, account number or other financial information to anyone over the phone unless you initiated the call and the other party is trusted.
  • Never pay a fee or taxes to collect sweepstakes or lottery “winnings.”
  • Never rush into a financial decision.  Ask for details in writing and get a second opinion. 
  • Consult with a financial advisor or attorney before signing any document you don’t understand.
  • Get to know your banker and build a relationship with the people who handle your finances. They can look out for any suspicious activity related to your account.
  • Check references and credentials before hiring anyone. Don’t allow workers to have access to information about your finances.
  • Pay with checks and credit cards instead of cash to keep a paper trail.
  • You have the right not to be threatened or intimidated. If you think someone close to you is trying to take control of your finances, call your local Adult Protective Services or tell someone at your bank.

 

If you believe you are a victim of financial abuse, be sure to:

  • Talk to a trusted family member who has your best interests at heart, or to your clergy.
  • Talk to your attorney, doctor or an officer at your bank.
  • Contact Adult Protective Services in your state or your local police for help.


World Elder Abuse Awareness Day was launched on June 15, 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations.

Hawaii National Bank is a community bank providing highly personalized service through 13 branches on Oahu, Maui and Hawaii. For more than 50 years the bank has specialized in serving individual account holders and locally owned, closely held businesses. Learn more at www.HawaiiNational.com.

           

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Every year, millions of people fall victim to cybercrime. According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, in 2014, consumers lost more than $800 million from scams initiated through the web. In recognition of Internet Safety Month in June, we are highlighting seven tips to help keep you protected from online fraud.

We recommend the following tips to keep you safe online:

  • Keep your computers and mobile devices up to date.  Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  • Set strong passwords. A strong password is at least eight characters in length and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.
  • Watch out for phishing scams. Phishing scams use fraudulent e-mails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. 
  • Forward phishing e-mails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the e-mail. 
  • Keep personal information personal. Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc.  Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  • Secure your Internet connection. Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  • Shop safely. Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with https. Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page. Hawaii National Bank uses secure technology throughout its website and mobile apps.
  • Read the site’s privacy policies. Privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.

 

At Hawaii National Bank, we take the security of your information seriously. We will never call or e-mail you requesting personal information such as account numbers or passwords. If you suspect you have been a victim of online fraud, please contact us immediately at (808) 528-7800.

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Your mobile device provides convenient access to your e-mail, bank and social media accounts. Unfortunately, it can potentially provide the same convenient access for criminals. The American Bankers Association recommends following these tips to keep your information – and your money – safe.

  • Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices. This will make it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  • Log out completely when you finish a mobile banking session.
  • Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software, or malware, just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  • Use caution when downloading apps. Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  • Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps.
  • Avoid storing sensitive information like passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  • Tell your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device.
  • Be aware of shoulder surfers. The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  • Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  • Beware of mobile phishing. Avoid opening links and attachments in e-mails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  • Watch out for public Wi-Fi. Public connections aren't very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  • Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.
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Though the internet has many advantages, it can also make users vulnerable to fraud, identity theft and other scams. According to Symantec, 12 adults become a victim of cybercrime every second. The American Bankers Association recommends the following tips to keep you safe online:

Keep your computers and mobile devices up to date. Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.

Set strong passwords. A strong password is at least eight characters in length and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.

Watch out for phishing scams. Phishing scams use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with.

Keep personal information personal. Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.

Secure your internet connection. Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.

Shop safely. Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with https. Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page.

Read the site’s privacy policies. Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.

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