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As millennials juggle a multitude of responsibilities -- from school, to work, to planning for major life events -- the American Bankers Association is highlighting eight banking tips to help them secure a financially sound future.

With a recent report finding that more than 4 in 10 U.S. millennials say they are “chronically stressed” about money, ABA recommends these eight tips to help them secure a strong financial footing:

  • Go cyber shopping for a bank that fits your style. There are lots of options out there with different advantages. Be selective and get the best prices, services, convenient locations and lowest fees for credit cards, bank accounts and loans.
  • Use bank tech to save without thinking about it. Consider automatic payroll deductions or automatic transfer from checking to savings. Arrange to have a specific amount transferred to your savings account every pay period.
  • Download your bank's mobile app and make some smooth moves. Manage your finances from the palm of your hand. With the click of a button, you can easily make a deposit or access a record of all your recent transactions. Be sure to download the latest updates when they are available.
  • Sign up for e-mail or text alerts. Get up-to-date info, on the go, the way you want it. Ask for an automatic alert when your balance falls below a certain level, or to confirm when certain types of transactions occur, such as online purchases or transactions of more than $500.
  • Use the personal finance tools your bank may offer. Banks offer an array of budgeting tools and resources to help you keep your finances in check. Access these via your bank’s mobile app and website.
  • Expect the unexpected – set up a rainy day fund. The last thing you want to be is stressed when life’s unexpected expenditures come knocking on your door. Set up a secondary checking or savings account for emergencies or link an existing account to your main account as an added layer of protection.
  • Get a head start. Banks play a major role in helping customers prepare for major life events such as buying a house and planning for retirement. Ask your banker how you can get a head start on your first major purchase by establishing credit or about starting a retirement account with a 401(k) from a previous employer.
  • Stay connected with social media. Interact with your bank via social media to get the latest news on products and services, ask bank-related questions, join in on conversations and find links to exclusive bank content. 
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We are taking a major step in our ongoing efforts to enhance your online security. Effective Tuesday, August 23, 2016, HawaiiNational.BANK will replace HawaiiNational.com.

Please update your online preferences to reflect the new web address. For your convenience, you will be automatically redirected to HawaiiNational.BANK from our old web address.


All Online Banking features and login information will remain the same.

Hawaii National Bank is the first bank in Hawaii to upgrade to the newly launched .BANK web address.

.BANK is only available for use by verified financial institutions. It offers a higher level of assurance with a strict 30-point registration process that prevents users from being redirected to fake bank websites set up to fraudulently obtain customer information.

.BANK was created by the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) as a trusted, more secure, and easily identifiable space on the internet for banks and their customers worldwide. It is managed by fTLD Registry Services, a group of banks, insurance companies and financial services trade associations, and registration eligibility is verified by Symantec, a globally recognized leader in internet security. The process includes a security check; banking credentials verification; and a review of the bank’s contact information.

In short, we are adopting the .BANK web address to provide you with improved security safeguards.

Please contact us at (808) 528-7711 with any questions. Visit us online 24/7 for secure, innovative and convenient banking services, including Online Bill Pay and external account transfers.

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14 Tips for Stopping Elder Financial Abuse in its Tracks

            Honolulu, HI – Every year, millions of seniors fall victim to financial fraud. Studies show elder financial abuse costs seniors approximately $2.9 billion each year. In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on June 15, Hawaii National Bank is urging older customers and their trusted caregivers to safeguard all personal information and stay alert to the common signs of financial abuse.

 

Hawaii National Bank is offering the following tips:

  • Plan ahead to protect your assets and to ensure your wishes are followed.  Talk to someone at your financial institution, an attorney, or financial advisor about the best options for you.
  • Carefully choose a trustworthy person to act as your agent in all estate-planning matters.
  • Lock up your checkbook, account statements and other sensitive information when others will be in your home.
  • Never give personal information, including Social Security Number, account number or other financial information to anyone over the phone unless you initiated the call and the other party is trusted.
  • Never pay a fee or taxes to collect sweepstakes or lottery “winnings.”
  • Never rush into a financial decision.  Ask for details in writing and get a second opinion. 
  • Consult with a financial advisor or attorney before signing any document you don’t understand.
  • Get to know your banker and build a relationship with the people who handle your finances. They can look out for any suspicious activity related to your account.
  • Check references and credentials before hiring anyone. Don’t allow workers to have access to information about your finances.
  • Pay with checks and credit cards instead of cash to keep a paper trail.
  • You have the right not to be threatened or intimidated. If you think someone close to you is trying to take control of your finances, call your local Adult Protective Services or tell someone at your bank.

 

If you believe you are a victim of financial abuse, be sure to:

  • Talk to a trusted family member who has your best interests at heart, or to your clergy.
  • Talk to your attorney, doctor or an officer at your bank.
  • Contact Adult Protective Services in your state or your local police for help.


World Elder Abuse Awareness Day was launched on June 15, 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations.

Hawaii National Bank is a community bank providing highly personalized service through 13 branches on Oahu, Maui and Hawaii. For more than 50 years the bank has specialized in serving individual account holders and locally owned, closely held businesses. Learn more at www.HawaiiNational.com.

           

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Every year, millions of people fall victim to cybercrime. According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, in 2014, consumers lost more than $800 million from scams initiated through the web. In recognition of Internet Safety Month in June, we are highlighting seven tips to help keep you protected from online fraud.

We recommend the following tips to keep you safe online:

  • Keep your computers and mobile devices up to date.  Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  • Set strong passwords. A strong password is at least eight characters in length and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.
  • Watch out for phishing scams. Phishing scams use fraudulent e-mails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. 
  • Forward phishing e-mails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the e-mail. 
  • Keep personal information personal. Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc.  Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  • Secure your Internet connection. Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  • Shop safely. Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with https. Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page. Hawaii National Bank uses secure technology throughout its website and mobile apps.
  • Read the site’s privacy policies. Privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.

 

At Hawaii National Bank, we take the security of your information seriously. We will never call or e-mail you requesting personal information such as account numbers or passwords. If you suspect you have been a victim of online fraud, please contact us immediately at (808) 528-7800.

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Hawaii National Bank Celebrates American Housing Month with Practical Advice for ‘Aging in Place’

 

The vast majority of older Americans want to remain in their homes as they grow older, also known as aging in place. Hawaii National Bank is offering the following tips for those considering this option:

 

Take a hard look at your finances. Arrange a meeting with a trusted family member or friend and a banker. It’s critical to understand your financial resources, how long they’ll last and what housing options are the most cost effective for you. Be sure to consider all costs associated with aging in place, including:

  • Home modifications
  • Transportation to medical appointments, shopping and other errands
  • In home caregiver for house upkeep and medical purposes

 

Consider a reverse mortgage. Though not for everyone, a reverse mortgage loan can provide monthly cash payments based on your home’s equity. 

  • Shop around. Be sure to check with multiple lenders. You can use sites like www.reversemortage.org, sponsored by the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association, to find lenders in your area.
  • Make sure to read all loan documents carefully. There are a number of actions that could cause the loan to become due.
  • For more information on reverse mortgages, visit aba.com/consumers. 

 

Assess your home and determine what modifications are necessary. While staying in your home is preferable for many, there are often design changes that must be made to ensure it’s also safe and comfortable.

  • Make sure there is at least one step-free entrance to your home.
  • Update lighting inside and outside of the house so that all walkways and stairs are well lit. Clear pathways throughout house and firmly secure all carpets to the floor to prevent tripping.
  • If a bedroom and bathroom does not or cannot exist on the first floor, consider installing an elevator or chairlift. At a minimum, make sure you have handrails on both sides of your stairs.
  • Install grab bars in the bathtub, shower, or near the toilet.

 

Make security a priority. Older Americans are often targets for scams and other criminal behavior. Be cautious about who you allow in your home and disclose sensitive information to.

  • Install up to date and easy to use locks. Make sure your front door has a peep hole or a security monitor so you can see who is outside. 
  • Consult someone you trust when hiring a contractor, financial advisor, etc.

 

Look into community resources. If mobility is limited, look in to services offered in your area. Many communities have established non-profit programs that offer transportation and food delivery to assist older Americans at a reasonable cost. 

 

Be prepared for possible emergencies.

  • Keep a list of all emergency contacts on your refrigerator or by a phone.
  • Consider a Personal Emergency Response System. Transmitters can be worn as a bracelet or around your neck and require the simple push of a button to send a signal to a call center.
  • Have your address number visible from the street so emergency responders can easily identify your home.

 

Reevaluate every six months to make sure all needs are being met. As you age, your needs inevitably change. Take time twice a year, or as needed, to sit down with your trusted family or friend and make sure your current living situation is still the right one. 


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